Finding Mindfulness Classes

Buddhist centres are usually the most economical places to learn mindfulness. They usually respect your own spiritual belief system, or lack thereof. Other places can be found by typing “meditation classes” or “mindfulness classes” into a search engine on the internet. However be aware that not all meditation is mindfulness. Some can even encourage mindlessness!

If you want teaching that is totally free from a particular spiritual system MBSR & MBCT are very good courses or any of the classes under the heading SECULAR MINDFULNESS CLASSES below.

CLASSES ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

Buddhist Centres www.buddhanet.net/wbd/

Vipassana (Goenka) as researched by Alan Marlatt: www.dhamma.org

CLASSES IN AUSTRALIA:

Buddhist Centres

Vipassana (Goenka) as researched by Alan Marlatt: www.dhamma.org/ausnz.htm

SECULAR MINDFULNESS CLASSES IN AUSTRALIA

Open Ground ( Australia ) Sydney, Canberra, Southern Highlands, Alice Springs, Perth does MBSR

Mindfulness Centre MBCT in Adelaide, Perth, Sunshine Coast, Canberra, Darwin, Alice Springs, Sydney

Adelaide

Centre for the Treatment of Anxiety and Depression – CTAD
Does MBCT
Contact Dr. Maura Kenny
ph: 08 8222 8100
email: maura.kenny@nwahs.sa.gov.au
Mindfulness Centre

Brisbane

Alison Keane MBSR

Hobart

Mindfulness-based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MCBT) - Bruno Cayoun

Melbourne

Ian Gawler (Yarra Junction) 

John Julian - MBSR ( Balwyn)

John Julian – Mindful Compassionate Communication ( Belgrave / Wantirna)

Michael Anderson (Geelong & Melbourne) 

Path out of Pain 

Tranquillizer Recovery And New Existence (TRANX)

Panic Anxiety & Depression Assistance (PADA) 

Steve Brown (Clifton Hill)

MBCT Training contact Bernadette.O’Grady@med.monash.edu.au

Northern NSW

Malcom Huxter

Sydney

Christine Burke – MBCT

Elizabeth Foley

ASSESSING ORGANISATIONS THAT TEACH MINDFULNESS CLASSES

Buddha Siddhartha gave good advice[1] on how to select a teacher and then how to relate to that teacher once selected. I have adapted these points to this situation.

  • First we need to assess if the teacher’s motivations are good. We can tell if teachers are motivated by greed, hate and confusion, by carefully examining their deeds, words and thoughts.
    • Is the teacher overly pushy in getting people to come to his/her classes or workshops? (especially repeat workshops)
    • Does the practitioner work to make participants stronger to face life or do they create unnecessary dependence?
    • Does the practitioner promote an attitude of compassion and understanding of all or do they denigrate certain groups? (e.g. males or females, perpetrators or victims, various religious or political groupings.)
  • Once we place trust in a good person we do not need to accept everything they say merely on the basis of faith. We must verify for ourselves whether what we have accepted on good faith is true or false. We can do this by a careful examination of how things have come to be. One of the most important things is to look find teachers who emphasise that mindfulness/meditation is a technique of awareness rather than a way of controlling the world and our minds.[1] Kalupahana David J & Indriani (1982)  pp 199-201
    The Way of Siddhartha; A Life of The Buddha
    Shambhala
    Boulder & London